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9420pullpan
02-26-2006, 07:58 PM
anyone have any time on these skip loaders. from what i hear they are very useful.

771

Dozerboy
02-27-2006, 07:19 PM
I have spent more time on them then I ever wanted to your back will never be so sore again. JD IMO is the best, but I have heard Cat has a nice setup too. I ran a few old Fords, and you want to talk about tedious work, modern skid steers would kill and old Ford in production.

Bob Horrell
02-27-2006, 10:27 PM
I spend a good bit of time on a John Deere skiploader, sometimes looking backwards all day long. You get a real good case of "tractor neck" from turning around all day. I found a beer when I get home goes a long way toward taking the kinks out of my neck.
I have a device similar to the red one on the back of the second skiploader except it has higher side plates and the blades in it are on an angle and are controlled with a hydraulic cylinder. It beats the heck out of a rear gannon on roads or any large flat surface. I specialize in finish grading and it has made me a lot of money. I have it so I can pull it behind the skiploader or push it in front of my skidsteer. On a washboard road the angle blades cut off the tops of the washboard much better than a gannon. It is 7 feet wide and 5 feet long. A very useful tool for many finish grading jobs.

RyanCKing
03-10-2006, 09:18 PM
I saw a Cat skip loader the other day anybody know if these have always been available or if it is something new? It looked like it had the same tractor as the 420Ds.

Jeff D.
03-11-2006, 12:30 AM
Forgive my ignorance,but what is the term "skiploader" referring too??

I've looked at the picture again and again,and what I see is a industrial tractor,with a front end loader and a three point hitch.A TLB without the B.

Is that a skiploader,or is there something in particular that makes this different than what I described??Something special about the loader,maybe??

Someone said there's no dumb questions.

digger242j
03-11-2006, 07:31 AM
Forgive my ignorance,...

We always have so far, haven't we? :)

I also am not really conversant with the term "skiploader". I'd heard the term, but I'd always thought it was someone's garbled pronunciation of skidloader. I guess I was mistaken.

I've seen similar machines used on pavement milling jobs, but they've been equipped with angling backblades, rather than just those boxes. They use a couple of them to clean up the crumbs that the milling machine fails to get onto its conveyor.

We learn something new every day...

Jeff D.
03-11-2006, 10:58 AM
If a skiploader is simply a tractor/loader with a three point,I could see how it would be very versitile.Especially for people like me who use equipment for work,and home.

I've a 6ft snowblower for the Farmall that would fit perfectly on the back of that,providing there's a PTO.

In some regards I like a loader like that more than a skidsteer.They may not be as manuveable,or efficient,but I'd feel more comfortable loading a truck with it,over a skidsteer.Just because of the added wheelbase,and the fact there's not dirt raining down on the cab when you lift it up that high.Also a more stable feel on uneven ground.

But maybe's there's more to the term than that?? :beatsme

Orchard Ex
03-11-2006, 02:59 PM
I had always assumed that it was referring to the European "skip" or container that gets dropped of on a building site - like a "swap-loader" here. The skip loader is either the truck that picks it up or the loader that fills it.
Maybe I'm mistaken too?

RyanCKing
03-11-2006, 09:14 PM
I’ve always have heard skip loaders are a western deal. From what I have heard it is a relatively small market. They are very abundant in California.
The John Deere 210 LE and Case and the Case570m are good example of the newest skip loaders. They are basically a backhoe loader with a 3pt or even just a counter weight.
They are much less expensive than a wheel loader while still maintaining good truck loading characteristics.

Bob Horrell
03-11-2006, 09:38 PM
What I have always found odd about skiploaders is that the max loading height is only around 9 to 9 and a half feet - much shorter than front end loaders. It is also much shorter than my S250 bobcat which is 10 and a half feet. Of course this holds true for the standard sized TLB as well.

Squizzy246B
03-11-2006, 11:04 PM
Hello Bob, Any chance of some photos of your box leveller??

farmerted44
03-11-2006, 11:19 PM
skiploaders real common here in the desert..used extensively in residential construction. grading house pads, landscaping ect. ect.
oh by the way we got rain alot today over 140 days with none.:notworthy

RyanCKing
03-11-2006, 11:29 PM
Bob or Farmerted
Have either of you ever seen a Cat skip loader?

CascadeScaper
03-12-2006, 04:08 AM
I saw a new(er) Case skiploader the other day. Nice looking machine. I think it was an M series. I've seen quite a few over in the Seattle area, although I'd probably never own one.

hillrancher
03-12-2006, 07:54 AM
I had always assumed that it was referring to the European "skip" or container that gets dropped of on a building site - like a "swap-loader" here. The skip loader is either the truck that picks it up or the loader that fills it.
Maybe I'm mistaken too?

This is where I think they got their name Do you remember the old cement mixers before ready-mix plants that were pull around to the job site and mixed the concrete on site. they were small to 6yds or. These had a skip that you put gravel, sand and ect in then was winched up by a cable into the mixer. They called the small loader a skip loader that loaded the skip.
There is a cat old just north of me looks like an old D4 pony start with a loader on it runs straight up a mask and the bucket trips and drops the load. The loader frame has a tag that reads caterpillar skip-loader.
My opinion not in stone.
DC

xkvator
03-12-2006, 09:00 AM
There is a cat old just north of me looks like an old D4 pony start with a loader on it runs straight up a mask and the bucket trips and drops the load. The loader frame has a tag that reads caterpillar skip-loader.
That is what I thought of as a skip loader...kinda like the skip cars that feed ore to the blast furnace.
But...They seem to call TLB's without the B, like Jeff said, a skiploader...it must be a west coast name, because i really never hear that around here.
My neighbor bought a new Ford 545 skiploader back in the '80's for the farm, and it was a pretty versatile & well used tractor till skidsteers became popular.
I think the op manual just calls it a Ford Industrial Loader.
I think the hyd. cyls. on the JD's in the pic, for downpressure on attachments like a boxblade, would be a good feature.

farmerted44
03-12-2006, 01:55 PM
Bob or Farmerted
Have either of you ever seen a Cat skip loader?
cmon to think of it no. nocats that i have seen.masseys,fords,deeres,case,newhollands, basically tractor manufacturers.
it is an overused term in arizona (imo) the guys at work even refer to our Cat IT24 as a skip loader. i ask em what do you call it when we have the forks on it?a skiplift? and they say i am a smartass. lol......
i generally refer to a tractor that the rear wheels are larger than the front, w/bucket in front and gannon or box scraper in rear as a skiploader.

Tigerotor77W
03-12-2006, 02:32 PM
Bob or Farmerted
Have either of you ever seen a Cat skip loader?

I have seen a Cat skip loader (also known as a landscpe loader) at Holt's San Antonio location. It is based on the 416D, not the 420D, but that's not that big a distinction...

Not my pics:
http://img457.imageshack.us/img457/3916/100457215md.jpg
http://img457.imageshack.us/img457/9391/100457323vu.jpg
http://img457.imageshack.us/img457/8625/100459535ai.jpg

farmerted44
03-12-2006, 06:34 PM
[QUOTE=Tigerotor77W]I have seen a Cat skip loader (also known as a landscpe loader) at Holt's San Antonio location. It is based on the 416D, not the 420D, but that's not that big a distinction...

yep tiger i would call that a skiploader. i've never seena cat one out here. good to know they make one though. interesting how different terminolgy can be here in this great country of ours.:yup :yup :yup

itsgottobegreen
03-12-2006, 08:45 PM
I was told they are called a landscape loader. The only one I saw was one that belonged to a paving contractor and it was sold at his going out of business auction for $18,900 something. I believe it was a JD 310 size 1995ish it was 4x4. Had a huge boxscraper on it that had hydraulic rippers.

RyanCKing
03-12-2006, 10:48 PM
thanks tigerotor
Thats must of what i have seen. To me it is a good alternative to a wheel loader of comparable size for doing dirtwork. I don't think it would be very competitive when just used for loading.

Dozerboy
03-13-2006, 11:40 PM
When I moved out west I had no idea what a skiploader was looked like a tractor with a boxblade to me. I think the Cats are smaller than the 416, I have seen a few I think there setuplike the Deeres.

Tigerotor77W
03-30-2006, 05:36 PM
Cat's getting better with its site...

http://www.cat.com/cda/components/fullArticle?m=38622&x=7&id=302408

CEwriter
03-30-2006, 06:08 PM
I saw this tractor at the same press event where Cat introduced the E Series backhoe loaders. Here are the quick specs . . .

Engine Model Cat 3054C DINA 74 net hp
Cat 3054C DIT 80 net hp

Operating Weight 11,376 lbs
Normal w/Box 13,960 lbs

Hyd Pump Closed Center 37 GPM @ 2200rpm

Loader 1-1.25 Cubic Yards
Lift Capacity 5,300
Dump Height 8'4"

Transport Height 9'1"
Transport Length 23'1"

Looks like that 22.5-degree seat angle might help quite a bit with the tractor neck, but I don't know this machine category that well. Might be it's on other manufacturers' machines, too.

Cat's the first in the market using pilot hydraulic controls in the loader.

They claim superior weight/drawbar pull. Seems like the 416D is heavier than many in the same horsepower range, but I haven't had a chance to do a careful comparison.

ADios

9420pullpan
03-30-2006, 08:40 PM
i have herd from a reliable source that the Cat skip loader is underpowered. and the deere 210le would run circles around them.........

Tigerotor77W
03-30-2006, 08:53 PM
9420, I think a lot of Deere equipment might be able to do that [, unfortunately]. (I'm a Cat guy. :))

farmerted44
03-31-2006, 01:46 AM
well , what do you know?!?! i am cruising down what used be a narrow cow trail of a road on the west side of phoenix.(it is now a six lane monster w/ housing going up like crazy on both sides. ) anyways i come to an intersection that is just alive of construction activity. i have planned on doing a lil pictorial about it.
what do you know , a jd skip loader. it was helping the blade man get a small chunk of street ready for asphalt.
anyways i dont like the way they left it parked. well i was very lucky to have my camera on me w/ fresh set of batteries.lol

Steve Frazier
03-31-2006, 07:16 PM
Ted, can't you see the tractor is holding the wires up out of the work area!!! LOL!!:lmao

hillrancher
03-31-2006, 09:22 PM
44 you can see that this operator stayed awake at operators school.

In my part of the earth there would be an winch on it dragging it out of a hollow.

farmerted44
04-01-2006, 01:20 AM
:nono i am glad i am not the only one that thought boy there is quite the safety violation. actually where is the common sense at???

Dozerboy
04-02-2006, 12:00 AM
Ya that is a no no, but at least it a Deere and most likely it ain't going anywhere. We have several skips for support and I see **** like that all of the time. And I really hate to see guys run them constantly with the bucket in the air like that. I have seen several temporary power lines knocked down and had to roll a few skips back over after they drove onto uneven ground and forgot the bucket was up.

keerym
10-13-2006, 11:17 AM
Here is a picture of Cat's new 414E skip loader that will be hitting dealers in the southwest this fall. Much imporved controls over the D model, and the 3 point hitch has been brought in closer to the chassis to make the machine shorter and more manueverable. As far as power goes, it has the same engine as the 416. 74 HP standard with a Turbo 89 HP optional. Should be plenty of power to pull a box blade.

334 lawn co
10-13-2006, 11:53 AM
anybody else notice the pintle on the box blade?sorry to hijack your pic farmerted.
i guess its a good idea. although i dont think i would ever do that to my blade., but hey, why not use a farm tractor with blade like we do? stronger parts on the industrial machines?

Dozerboy
10-13-2006, 07:52 PM
anybody else notice the pintle on the box blade?sorry to hijack your pic farmerted.
i guess its a good idea. although i dont think i would ever do that to my blade., but hey, why not use a farm tractor with blade like we do? stronger parts on the industrial machines?


Some of there are just that, but with the Deere you can actually lift the rear tires off the ground with the blade you ain't going to do that with a standard 3 point. Lots of guys run hitches on there blade, I don't think there much it any stronger.

334 lawn co
10-14-2006, 08:36 PM
i figured that and when i took a closer look i saw the hydro to put downpressure on the blade. so... i figure i can see the advantages.

Jeff D.
10-14-2006, 09:06 PM
I know most don't, but some of the farm tractor three points can have the lift links replaced with solid links and then they'll have down pressure (if they have double acting rams). I've run some old Fords that had, and my Farmall has down pressure on the three point.

Sure makes it nice when you bury them in the field. You can use it to lift the back tires up out of the hole, throw some wood underneith the tires(repeat a couple times maybe), and off you go.

farmerted44
10-14-2006, 10:19 PM
no problem with using the pic guys. actually didnt notice the pintle hitch welded to the box scraper.
we have the same mounted on our 140G,D8T,and D8N ripper bars.
we are able to pull everything from our welders,pressure washers,all the way up to our truck tipper!
my camera is broke or i would post some pics.

334 lawn co
10-16-2006, 02:33 PM
on our new holland, the other day i noticed a ram that pushes out on the top 3 point hitch link. is this what this could be?ill post a pic of it later when i get home.

Taylortractornu
12-08-2006, 08:06 PM
334 The LL Landscape or skip loaders are a little bit heavier built than a farm or utility tractor. They have down pressure as well as a float to. and they also have a hydraulic top line and both arms on the 3 point have a cylinder for tilt, and the box has a set of hydraulic rippers.. they work wonders. Lots of paving crews use them. My old 75 Ford Industrial LB has a quick hitch no pto thats used to hold the hoe on but it had a boxblade set up available.
They do get old looking back all the time A friend worked for a shop and I helped a bit take one and make the steering wheel offset with the seat at a 45 degree angle to make it easier to use. It really helped a lot. to use the loader you pulled a lever and rotated the seat back forward. Case JD Ford and MF,and IH all made these and Cat just now joined and along with Terex wel lthat was MF at one time. I think Cats earier Versions were done by a company Called Fox they modified several Cat 416's to make LL loaders and small 7 yard elevating scrapers.

Dualie
11-18-2007, 01:29 AM
The reason behind skip loaders is SPEED. You can really cover some ground banging on a skip loader. There shuttle shift so you can Really make some time up rough grading with the box blade then slow it down to finish grade.

Mostly paving and grading contractors use em. I haven't seen a "paving spread" that didn't have a skip loader in its roster for a long time. Most all the ones around here have a 4-in-1 bucket on the front.

The pintle on the back of the gannon is for moving around the "ant eaters" the weird conveyor that picks the asphalt up off the ground and feeds it into the paver. "anteaters" do not have power to the wheels, just power for feeder functions.

engin42
04-22-2009, 06:07 PM
Couple of details on the Fox skiploader mentioned--it wasn't a Cat 416, but it shared some of the same components. The engine, axles, and transmission were common to the Cat 416, but the rest of it was unique to Fox. The 3 point hitch and the box blade were Gannon. It was peddled pretty much as if it were all Cat, and some dealers took the Fox decals off. For all the "Cat Components", most of the 416's components aren't quite pure cat--the engine is Perkins (Perkipillar, now), the transmission is Turner (now maybe owned by cat?), the rear axle is New Holland, and the front axle is ZF. I think they have since moved on to Carrarro axles, though. Fox is unfortunately gone.

Tex
09-27-2009, 02:15 PM
I have a Case 570XLT skip loader......can anyone tell me where to go ( on the internet) as to verify the year it was made?

CEwriter
09-28-2009, 10:12 AM
You might try the National Equipment Register (www.NERUSA.org). They have some expertise with reading Product Identification Numbers (PINs). Although you will probably have to call them with a request like this. I don't believe they have a Find Year of Manufacture service online.

Tex
09-28-2009, 01:28 PM
I looked up the site you shared, it is geared towards stole equipment, and registering your equipment. Thanks for the try though.

JAK5
09-28-2009, 05:58 PM
Check out what they used to call DoMor. This thing was the ultimate "skip loader"... Do a search on HEF and there is some pretty good info on them, its worth the search. Incredibly handy rig, the company I used to work for and quite a few of them.

Mikefromcny
02-21-2010, 01:58 PM
heres my 67' Massey 2200

9420pullpan
02-21-2010, 06:06 PM
To all of you West Coast boys in need some pics of an Asphalt Float (http://www.thomaswelding.com/products/infopage/Asphalt_float.htm)in action. If you have any pics please share. I want to get on over here on the east coast, gotta sell it to the boss first.

thanks

That_Fulla
11-29-2010, 12:36 AM
Over in california everyone has one of these for landscaping and paving. Not very common in NZ though. You can sure get some work done with them though. With wheel weights, clam bucket and a ripper box they suit many small scale jobs.

Xvator
08-16-2013, 11:10 AM
It's interesting though! I run a Deere skip, never new why it's called that

roadrunner81
08-17-2013, 11:49 AM
I've spent my fare share of time on a 570L skip loader fine grading for over 1m sq ft of sod within the last two years. Very versatile machine, only draw back of the 3pt set up over a standard TLB is lack of weight on rear axle so pushing into a pile requires 4x4 and no back hoe. I've also got mixed feelings on the clam shell bucket as its so thick it has a lot more resistance going into a pile and adds to the 4x4 need. Other wise a great machine, much faster than a skid steer and leaves a ready surface unlike a dozer.

glenlunberg
08-27-2013, 10:00 PM
Nice skip loaders here. I don't have much information about these machines but I admire them because they're look very awesome.